Posts Tagged ‘CSS’

CSS for Deprecated HTML Attributes: Part 3

Thursday, March 8th, 2007

In this series of articles I have described how to remove the deprecated attributes in HTML and replicate the styles using CSS. The first part looked at hspace and vspace, type and border. Part two described how to replicate link, alink and vlink, size, noshade and clear. In this final part I will be mopping up width, height, bgcolor and align. (more…)

CSS for Deprecated HTML Attributes: Part 2

Saturday, February 10th, 2007

In Part 1 of CSS for Deprecated HTML Attributes, I described how to replace HTML’s deprecated attributes with CSS, which is more flexible and inline with web standards in use today. If you want to convert an existing site that is using out of date practices or want to understand how to bring your own development up to scratch, then these articles are for you.

Let’s get straight into it with link, alink and vlink. I’ll also cover clear, size and noshade. (more…)

CSS for Deprecated HTML Attributes: Part 1

Friday, February 2nd, 2007

When HTML 4.0 was introduced some attributes became deprecated. Browsers continued to support them to ensure older sites continued to display correctly, and developers were urged to stop using them in favour of more flexible alternatives such as CSS.

The deprecated attributes were purely presentational, meaning they are only of benefit for the way the element will look. We remove presentational aspects to a CSS file to separate content and structure from the look of a web page. This has many benefits for the user, developer and holder of the bandwidth purse-strings. (more…)

Helping the Developers

Saturday, October 7th, 2006

In a recent article, Marco Battilana wrote about how he ensured his standards-compliant designs remained so after handing them over to a client. His solution was to target the depreciated tags and attributes and style them using BRAT, which made the developer acutely aware that there was some problem behind their WYSIWYG‘d page.

I had a similar problem a couple of years ago when I was employed by a company to tidy up front-end code and to design a cleaner looking user interface and I had to come up with a subtle way of steering them in the right direction. (more…)

WCAG: Relative and Absolute Units

Monday, June 19th, 2006

WCAG Accessibility Checkpoints

The WCAG (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines) 1.0, Priority 2 Checkpoint 3.4, states that you should:

Use relative rather than absolute units in markup language attribute values and style sheet property values

View the checkpoint

Originally I thought this meant that anywhere a font size, width or height was mentioned I only had the option of use ems or percentages. Then this seemed to be saying to me to design all sites using a liquid layout, which was strange as people were always saying that the guidelines do not dictate design. (more…)