JavaScript: Accessible Search Toggle

This post is now out-of-date. Please refer to jQuery accessible search toggle instead.

To use a script in a way that ensures users without JavaScript get the same functionality as users with it enabled means it is accessible. It doesn’t necessarily mean the same user experience, but both must be able to view the same information. An example of this is using a script to open a new window to show some extra information: with script disabled the user should be able to view the same information, but within the same window.

Toggle via Radio Buttons

I want to allow the user to search within all sections of a website or to search within one or more chosen groups. The list should only be visible when the user selects that they want to choose groups. To do this I am going to use 2 radio buttons to toggle the unordered list of sections on and off. Continue reading

WCAG: Relative and Absolute Units

WCAG Accessibility Checkpoints

The WCAG (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines) 1.0, Priority 2 Checkpoint 3.4, states that you should:

Use relative rather than absolute units in markup language attribute values and style sheet property values

View the checkpoint

Originally I thought this meant that anywhere a font size, width or height was mentioned I only had the option of use ems or percentages. Then this seemed to be saying to me to design all sites using a liquid layout, which was strange as people were always saying that the guidelines do not dictate design. Continue reading